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Full text of "East Carolina Teachers College Bulletin Graduate Instruction"

Vol.32 December, 1941 No. 4 

EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 



Greenville, north Carolina 



Published four times each year — March, May, August, and December. 

Entered as second-class matter March 16, L936, ;ii the Port Oflta 

at Greenville, N. C, under ad of Congress ol Aagnsl 84, 1!U2. 



CALENDAR 1942-1943 



SUMMER QUARTER 1942 

June 4 Thursday — Registration for first term 

June 5 Friday — Class work begins 

June 11 Thursday — Last day to register 

July 4 Saturday — Holiday 

July 15 Wednesday — First term ends 

July 16 Thursday — Registration for second term 

July 23 Thursday — Last day to register 

Aug. 22 Saturday — Summer school closes 

FALL QUARTER 1942 

Sept. 22-23 Tuesday and Wednesday — Freshman reg- 
istration 

Sept. 24 Thursday — Registration of upperclassmen 

Sept. 25 Friday — Class work begins 

Oct. 8 Thursday — Last day to register 

Nov. 25 Wednesday, 12 M. — Thanksgiving holiday 

begins 

Nov. 30 Monday, 8:00 A. M. — Class work resumed 

Dec. 18 Friday, 12 M. — Fall quarter closes, Christ- 
mas recess begins 

WINTER QUARTER 1943 

Jan. 4 Monday — Registration and classification 

Jan. 5 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Class work begins 

Jan. 18 Monday-^-Last day to register 

Mar. 13 Saturday — Winter quarter closes, Spring 

recess begins 

SPRING QUARTER 1943 

Mar. 18 Thursday — Registration and Classification 

Mar. 19 Friday, 8:10 A. M. — Class work begins 

April 1 Thursday — Last day to register 

May 27 Thursday, 4:25 P. M. — Examinations close 

May 28 Friday to May 31, Monday — Commence- 
ment exercises 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 

SUMMER QUARTER 1943 

June 3 Thursday — Registration for first term 

June 4 Friday — Class work begins 

June 10 Thursday — Last day to register 

July 14 Wednesday — First term ends 

July 15 Thursday — Registration for second term 

July 22 Thursday — Last day to register 

Aug. 27 Friday — Summer school closes 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
Part One — Officers and Graduate Faculty 

Board of Trustees 5 

Officers of the Board of Trustees 5 

Committee on Graduate Instruction 6 

Graduate Faculty 6 

Part Two — Graduate Instruction 

Library 8 

Admission to Graduate Instruction 9 

Requirements for the M.A. Degree 10 

Part Three — General Information 

Fees and Expenses 12 

Withdrawals, Refunds and Credits 13 

Student Loan Fund 13 

Part Four — Departments of Graduate 
Instruction 

Administration and Supervision 14 

Education 16 

English 20 

Geography 21 

History 22 

Mathematics 23 

Natural Science 24 

Psychology 28 

Social Science 29 



PART ONE 

OFFICERS AND GRADUATE FACULTY 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Term 
Expires 

Hon. Clyde A. Erwin, Chairman 

ex officio Raleigh 

Robert R. Taylor Greenville 1941 

F. C. Harding Greenville 1941 

J. Herbert Waldrop Greenville 1941 

Henry C. Bridgers Tarboro 1941 

0. P. Makepeace Sanford 1943 

Mrs. Charles M. Johnson Raleigh 1943 

J. K. Warren Trenton 1943 

A. B. Andrews Raleigh 1943 

Mrs. John G. Dawson Kinston 1945 

Mrs. Charles S. Forbes Greenville 1945 

Dr. Paul Fitzgerald Greenville 1945 

Mrs. W. B. Murphy Snow Hill 1945 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Clyde A. Erwin 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Ex Officio Chairman 

Agnes W. Barrett, Secretary 

F. D. Duncan, Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Clyde A. Erwin, Chairman F. C. Harding 

A. B. Andrews 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Henry C. Bridgers, Chairman O. P. Makepeace 

Leon R. Meadows, Secretary 



6 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 

E. L. Henderson, Ph.D., Administration and Supervi- 
sion, Chairman 

Carl L. Adams, Ph.D., Education and Psychology 

R. L. Hilldrup, Ph.D., History 

Herbert ReBarker, Ph.D., Mathematics 

R. J. Slay, Ph.D., Science 

Lucile Turner, Ph.D., English, Secretary to the Com- 
mittee 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

Leon R. Meadows, Ph.D., President 

Carl L. Adams, Ph.D., Director of Department of Edu- 
cation and Psychology 

Denver Ewing Baughan, Ph.D., English 

B. B. Brandt, Ph.D., Science 

W. A. Browne, Ph.D., Geography 

Lucile Charlton, M.A., Education 

Dora E. Coates, M.A., Primary Education 

James B. Cummings, M.A., Geography 

Sallie Joyner Davis, North Carolina History 

Will Scott DeLoach, Ph.D., Science 

Elinor Elizabeth England, M.A., Mathematics 

Beecher Flanagan, Ph.D., Economics and Government 

Arthur D. Frank, Ph.D., Director of Department of 
History 

Maria D. Graham, M.A., Mathematics 

Mary Hemphill Greene, M.A., English 

Lois G. Grigsby, M.A., English 

Hubert C. Haynes, Ph.D., Education 

E. L. Henderson, Ph.D., Director of Department of Ad- 
ministration and Supervision 

Robert Leroy Hilldrup, Ph.D., History 

E. C. Hollar, M.A., History 

Emma L. Hooper, M.A., English \ 

Mary Emily Humphreys, Ph.D., Science 

Mamie E. Jenkins, M.A., English 

Howard J. McGinnis, Ph.D., Registrar and Psychology 

Annie C. Newell, M.A., Education 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 7 

P. W. Picklesimer, M.A., Director of Department of 

Geography 
Meredith Neill Posey, Ph.D., English 
Herbert ReBarker, Ph.D., Director of Department of 

Mathematics 
Charles W. Reynolds, Ph.D., Science 
Ronald J. Slay, Ph.D., Director of Department of 

Science 
Paul A. Toll, Ph.D., Social Science 
Alice Lucile Turner, Ph.D., Director of Department of 

English 
Louise Williams, M.A., Mathematics 
Christine Wilton, Ph.D., Science 
Martin L. Wright, M.A., Director of Department of 

Social Science 



PART TWO 

GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 



Purpose. Graduate instruction is organized to provide 
for three classes of graduate students: first, those who 
wish to become school administrators or supervisors; 
second, those who wish to secure Graduate Certificates; 
and, third, those who wish to do work beyond the 
Bachelor's Degree without reference to a higher degree 
or certification. 

Faculty. The administration and direction of graduate 
instruction is in charge of a Director of the Department 
of Graduate Instruction and a committee of five members 
of the faculty appointed by the President of the College. 
The teaching faculty of Graduate Instruction includes 
only those members of the college faculty specially desig- 
nated by the directors of the departments that offer 
graduate work. 

Library. The East Carolina Teachers College Library 
is making every effort consistent with its major program 
to meet the needs of the graduate department. The same 
fully-trained staff that serves during the academic year 
functions during the entire summer session. A consistent 
effort has been made, and is continuing, to complete sets 
of periodicals and journals of value to graduate students. 
The holdings of the congressional proceedings have 
recently been tripled. 

The Library now has over 40,000 volumes, many of 
which were purchased specifically or mainly for graduate 
use at the requests of those faculty members interested 
in graduate courses. The reference collection contains 
practically all the major reference sets in English and 
several in other languages. 

It is the established policy of the Library to make every 
reasonable effort to secure materials needed that we do 
not have ; if it is not possible to do so by purchase, then it 
usually is by borrowing or photographing in larger 
institutions. 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 9 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 

Admission to graduate instruction must be made to the 
Director of Graduate Instruction. Blanks for this purpose 
may be secured from his office. 

To be admitted to graduate instruction the candidate 
must hold a Bachelor's Degree from this college or from 
some other institution of equal rank or lack not more than 
six quarter hours of work to complete the residence re- 
quirement for the Bachelor's Degree, provided he is 
recommended for graduate standing by the director of 
his major department. He must also have met the under- 
graduate requirements for his major and minor fields and 
made not less than an average grade of three in all his 
undergraduate work. 

If the undergraduate work of an applicant does not 
show the completion of at least fifteen quarter hours in 
English, nine of which shall be Composition, and twenty- 
four quarter hours in a combination of Education and 
Psychology, such deficiencies shall be made up before the 
Master's Degree will be conferred. 

Admission to graduate instruction is not equivalent to 
admission to candidacy for the degree of Master of Arts. 

Transcripts. Graduates from other institutions must 
present an official transcript of all high school and college 
work completed. This transcript shall be filed with the 
Registrar of the College before the first enrollment. 

General Information. Each graduate student should 
choose a major field and consult the director of graduate 
study in that department with reference to the work to 
be done in that department. 

Each graduate is also expected to select a minor field 
of study. This should be chosen as nearly as possible to 
supplement the student's work in the major field. 

Courses numbered 300 to 399 may be taken by graduate 
students if they are designated in the catalog as being 
open to graduate students. However, not more than 
twelve quarter hours of work may be taken from courses 
numbering below 400. 



10 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Courses numbering 400 or above in the general college 
catalog are open to graduate students only. 

Marks. Credit is given for graduate work only for 
marks "1," "2," and "3." However, two-thirds of a 
student's work must be above a "3." 

Transfer of Credit. A limited amount of acceptable 
graduate credit earned in a fully accredited institution 
may be offered to apply on the Master of Arts degree. 
Such credit is allowed only on the recommendation of the 
department or departments concerned and the approval 
of the Committee on Graduate Instruction. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS 

Admission to Candidacy. Each student must make 
application to the Director of Graduate Instruction for 
admission to candidacy not later than the first week of 
the quarter or summer session at the close of which the 
degree is to be conferred. 

Residence. At least three full quarters must be spent 
in residence, provided that nine quarter hours shall count 
as the minimum of work for one quarter in residence. 

Course Requirements. A candidate for the degree of 
Master of Arts may complete either of the following plans 
of work : 

a. Eighteen quarter hours in a major field, nine quarter 
hours in education and psychology or in a combi- 
nation of both, six quarter hours of seminar, twelve 
quarter hours of electives, and a thesis. The elec- 
tives shall be chosen with the advice of the director 
of the major department and should be so chosen as 
to qualify the candidate for a Graduate Certificate. 

b. Twenty-four quarter hours in a major field, nine 
quarter hours in education and psychology or in a 
combination of both, and twelve hours of electives 
to be chosen with the advice of the director of the 
major department. The electives should be so 
chosen as to qualify the candidate for the Graduate 
Certificate. 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 11 

Not more than fifteen quarter hours of work may be 
taken in any one quarter. 

Thesis. If a thesis is written it must show the result 
of an investigation of some educational problem related 
to the major field. The subject of the thesis must be 
approved by the director of the major department and by 
the Committee on Graduate Instruction at least two 
quarters before the degree is conferred. One approved 
typewritten copy of the thesis must be filed with the 
librarian of the college and one copy must be filed with 
the director of the major department before the degree is 
conferred. 

No credit is given for the seminar until after the thesis 
has been finally approved. 

Teaching Ability. Each student must satisfy the Com- 
mittee on Graduate Instruction as to his ability to teach. 
This may be done in either of two ways : (a) successful 
teaching experience, or (b) successful student teaching. 



PART THREE 

GENERAL INFORMATION 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Day Students. The fee for day students, i.e., those not living 
in one of the college dormitories, is $33.50 per quarter of twelve 
weeks. 

Dormitory Students. The fee for dormitory students is $93.50 
per quarter. This fee covers tuition, instruction, board, room, 
laundry, rental of textbooks, admission to college entertainments, 
subscription to the college paper, and infirmary service for minor 
illness. 

Reservation Fee. A reservation fee of $5.00 must accompany 
the application for admission from all students. The fee is 
credited to the student's account, provided he enrolls in the 
quarter for which reservation is made. If he wishes to with- 
draw his application and notifies the college in writing at least 
two weeks before the opening of the 'quarter, the fee will be 
returned, except that no refund of a fall quarter fee will be made 
if requested after September tenth. 

Fees Payable Each Quarter by All Students 

Board and Registration Student 

Room Books, etc. Tuition Activity Total 

Day Student $7.50 $20.00 $6.00 $33.50 

Dormitory Student $60.00 $7.50 $20.00 $6.00 $93.50 

All the fees above, except the student activity fee, must be paid 
to the Treasurer at the beginning of the quarter. 

The student activity fee must be paid to the Treasurer of the 
Student Fund at the beginning of the quarter. 

Other Fees 

Non residents of N. C. (per quarter) $20.00 

Private music lessons (per quarter) 7.00 

Laboratory fees in certain subjects 2.00 

Diploma fee (with application for graduation) 5.00 

Late registration 1.00 

Changes in schedule (per subject) .25 

Transcript (after first) .50 

"Auditor" in one or more courses 6.00 

Infirmary fee* 1.00 



►Charged day .students not living in own homes. (Jives infirmary service. 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 13 

Special students, i.e., day students who schedule not more than 
six credit hours per quarter, will pay a fee of $2.00 per credit 
hour scheduled. 

These fees are subject to revision by the Board of Trustees of 
the college. 

To be exempt from the out-of-state fee: 

1. The parents or guardian of a student must be residents of 
the state at the time of his registration, or 

2. The student must have established residence in the state at 
least six months before he entered the college. 

A resident student is construed to be one who actually lives in 
the State and not one who has merely moved into the State for 
the purpose of securing an education from one of the State 
Institution. 

Withdrawals, Refunds, Credits. Students who, for any reason, 
withdraw from the college before the end of any quarter will have 
a proportionate part of the amount paid for board refunded. In 
addition, if a student withdraws before registration for the 
quarter is closed, one-half of the fees for room and tuition will 
also be refunded. Refund will be calculated from the date of 
official withdrawal from the College. 

A student desiring to withdraw from college should do so with 
the consent of his parent or guardian and the approval of the 
Registrar. Students who withdraw unofficially are not eligible to 
re-enroll in the college. 

Credit. No degree, diploma, or certificate will be granted or 
a transcript of credits furnished a student until all financial 
obligations to the college, other than student loans, have been 
paid. 

All previously incurred expenses at the college must be fully 
paid or secured before a student may re-enter at the beginning of 
any quarter. 

Student Loan Fund. If a student who is doing graduate work 
in the College needs additional money to help finance his edu- 
cation, he may make application for a loan to the Loan Fund 
Committee of the College. However, no student may borrow- 
more than the actual college expenses for any one quarter, and 
no student may borrow a total of more than $250.00. Appli- 
cation for a loan must be made to the Treasurer on blanks 
furnished for that purpose. Application should be made at hast 
two weeks before the beginning of the quarter for which the loan 
is desired. 

Scholarship and student government records are considered in 
awarding loans. 



PART FOUR 

DEPARTMENTS OF GRADUATE 
INSTRUCTION 



ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION 

Mr. Henderson and Mr. Adams 
SENIOR AND GRADUATE COURSE 

330. Educational Statistics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for prospective principals and supervisors. 

Aim: to drill students in manipulation of educational 
data for purposes of interpretation. 

Topics: tabular and graphic methods; measures of 
central tendency, variability, and relationships; norms; 
T-score; B-score; and principles of sampling. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

405. Administration of the Elementary School. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course deals with such topics as: selection and 
training of teachers; the place of the teacher in the ad- 
ministrative program; child accounting; school discipline 
and its relation to administration; and the general relation 
of the elementary school to the community. 

406. The Elementary School Principal. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
For those preparing to be elementary school principals. 

Topics: personality and training of the principal; ad- 
ministrative and supervisory duties; relation to the 
county; management of his office; division of his time. 

407. Budgets and Accounting for Public Schools. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for school principals. 

Topics: sources, management, and expenditure of 
school revenue; value of community property; indebted- 
ness and taxation; growth of school population and cost 
per capita; and other data necessary for intelligent 
budget-making and accounting. 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 15 

408. Public School Administration. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for school principals and supervisors. 

Topics: development of administrative units of our 
public school systems; boards of education; relation of 
superintendent to the school and the public; preparation, 
tenure, and promotion of teachers; publicity and education 
of the public; pupil accounting and records. 

409. High School Administration. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course treats such topics as: the selection and 
training of the teaching staff; the place of the teacher in 
the high school administrative program; pupil accounting; 
pupil guidance; curricular offerings and organization; 
extra-curricular activities and their relation to the school 
program; and the relation of the high school to the 
community. 

421. Curricula for Public Schools. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students preparing to meet State requirements 
for principals and supervisors of elementary schools. 

Topics: needs for curricula revision; principles of cur- 
riculum revision; tendencies in the organization of ele- 
mentary and high school subjects; type studies. 

426. Theories of Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students preparing to meet State requirements 
for principals and supervisors of elementary schools. 

Topics: European and American movements and in- 
fluences from Comenius, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel. 
Herbart, Mann, Parker, Dewey, and others, who are 
directly and indirectly responsible for modern educational 
theory and practices in the elementary and high schools. 

428. Supervision of Instruction. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students preparing to meet State requirements 
for principals and supervisors. 

Topics: functions of the supervisor; ways and means 
of promoting better classroom teaching; adaptation of 
course of study to special needs of community; relation of 
supervisor and teacher; technique of criticism. 

429. Instructional Problems of the Unadjusted Child. 

Three hours a week. Credit: thrpe quarter hours. 
This course makes a detailed study of the problems of 



16 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

the unadjusted child; diagnosis of particular difficulties 
and application of remedial measures. 

430. Educational Statistics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for prospective principals and supervisors. Con- 
tinuation of Administration and Supervision 330. Prere- 
quisite: Educational Statistics 330. 

Topics: partial correlations, multiple correlations, 
linear regressions, use of normal probability curve to 
interpret data; weighing scores; comparing groups; 
tabulations, etc. 

431. Apprentice Work in Administration and Super- 
vision. 

Six hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for all those preparing to be principals or 
supervisors. 

Each student in this course is assigned to a principal or 
supervisor as an assistant in actually doing the work the 
student will be required to do as a principal or supervisor. 
Each student is required to attend conferences between 
the principal and his staff, the supervisor and his teachers, 
and any other meetings held for groups of teachers, super- 
visors, or principals. 

432. Training Teachers in Service. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
For prospective principals and supervisors. 

Topics: evaluation of the different types of in-service 
training, study groups, conference groups, extension 
groups, teachers' meetings, county and state associations, 
reading clubs, experimental teaching. 

EDUCATION 

Mr. Adams, Miss Coates, Miss Charlton, Mr. Haynes, 
Mr. Henderson, Mr. McGinnis, Miss Newell 

SENIOR AND GRADUATE COURSE 

306. Social Sciences in the Primary Grades. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

The purpose of this course is to show child development 
through social science experiences. 

Topics: ways the social sciences develop; content of the 
social sciences; arrangement of environment conducive to 
children's social growth; participating in making records 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 17 

of children's social science curriculum in action; organizing 
potential units of work; and making studies of play 
materials, books, pictures, and stories. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

400. a.b.c. Seminar. 

Two hours a week. Three quarters. Credit: six 
quarter hours. 

In this course each student, under the direction and 
guidance of his adviser, presents at least one problem or 
subject each quarter. These problems are to be discussed 
and each student is supposed to take the lead in the dis- 
cussion of his problem. Problems are to be chosen from 
major fields. The study of the problem must show 
original research or original organization on the part of 
the student presenting it. 

405. Investigations in the Teaching of Reading. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The course consists in making an analytical study of 
researches that have been reported on the various phases 
of the teaching of reading. The child's difficulties in be- 
coming familiar with the reading processes, the teaching 
difficulties in the subject, remedial work designed for the 
child's benefit, and a critical evaluation of the research 
studies with special reference to the psychological prin- 
ciples involved and the educational implications to be de- 
rived are given serious consideration in this course. 

412. Improvement of Reading Instruction in the Primary 
Grades. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is planned for teachers of experience. Indi- 
vidual teaching problems will be given consideration. 

Topics: Factors conditioning children's success in 
reading; a study of the experiences of children which 
affect their reading interests; the utilization of these 
interests in the acquiring of desirable reading attitudes, 
habits, and skills; evaluation of methods of teaching 
reading, and materials characteristic of current practice 
Demonstrations of the telebinocular and other mechanized 
reading aids are a part of this course. There will be 
observations in the Training School. 

417. Study of Some of the Major Problems of the 
Grammar Grades. 

The student will distribute the working time each week 
as follows: A minimum of two hours observat ion in the 



18 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Training School, two hours library work, two hours group 
conference a week, and three hours a week in conference 
with the instructor. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The class divides into working committees with a chair- 
man and a secretary. Each committee schedules its own 
time and place for meetings. Each student selects some 
major problem or problems with which he wants to work. 
A list of these problems is given to the teacher for 
evaluation before the student begins work on them. 

Reports are to be presented both orally to the whole 
group, and to the teacher in writing with complete records 
of individual and group activities attached. The chairman 
of each group keeps a check on attendance for individuals 
in his group. 

Pre-observation conference with the critic teachers is 
necessary before observing in the room. The groups meet 
the critic teachers in conferences following the obser- 
vations. 

420. Visual Aids in Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
For teachers and administrators who wish to make use of 
objective teaching aids, including the school journey, 
slides, prints, and the motion picture. Available 
materials in these fields are surveyed and attention given 
to the problem of selection and integrated use in the school 
program. 

Sources of supply for all materials and projection appa- 
ratus and care of materials and equipment will be con- 
sidered. A survey of literature in this field will be made. 

422. History and Philosophy of Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course takes up the historical development of the 
principles and practices of education from the earliest 
times to the present. Education as an expression of the 
aims of life for the individual and social group is studied. 

423. History and Philosophy of Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is a continuation of Education 422. 

426. Modern Trends in Secondary Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to make an analytical study 
of the shifts and changes of emphasis current in the field 
of secondary education. 

Trends as they are found (a) in current educational 
literature; (b) in changing emphasis observable in cur- 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 19 

riculum materials; and (c) in current beliefs as to the 
functions of the junior high school and the junior college. 
Special effort is directed to the philosophical antecedents 
of educational practice. 

427. The Beginning and Development of Secondary 
Education in the United States. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course traces the transfer of the secondary school 
from its origin in Europe to the United States; its early 
beginnings as a private or semi-private institution here; 
its development into a tax-supported institution; and its 
rapid growth and development since 1900. 

ENGLISH 

Miss Turner, Mr. Baughan, Miss Greene, Miss Grigsby, 
Miss Hooper, Miss Jenkins, Mr. Posey 

SENIOR AND GRADUATE COURSES 

314. Modern Drama. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Offered in alternate years. 

A study of representative modern dramatists — Maeter- 
linck, Hauptmann, Galsworthy, Barrie, Shaw, O'Neill, and 
a number of others — with some attention to types and 
movements. 

317. The Essay. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Offered in alternate years. 

A survey of the history of the essay and a study of the 
various types. Collateral reading required. 

319. Modern Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Offered in alternate years. 

A survey of American and English poetry from 1900 to 
the present time, including a study of the poetic move- 
ments and contemporary trends of the major poets, and 
representative poems. 

326. Romantic Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Prerequisite: English 112b. Offend in 
alternate years. 

Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats em- 
phasized. Some attention to less important contempo- 
raries. 



20 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

GRADUATE COURSES 

400. a.b.c. Seminar. 

Three quarters. Two hours a week. Credit: six quarter 
hours. 

A study of bibliographical practice and method in con- 
nection with thesis writing. Advice as to suitable subjects 
for original research papers and round table discussion of 
finished products a necessary part of the work. 

405. Current Problems in the Teaching of English. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: English 220. 

A critical study of those statistical investigations, 
laboratory experiments, and philosophical writings which 
record the status and point out the needs and the prospects 
in the teaching of English. 

413. Studies in English Literature. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

Studies in English literature to 1750, selected by the 
instructor upon consultation with the students. 

414. Studies in English Literature. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

Studies in English literature from 1750 to 1900, selected 
by the instructor upon consultation with the students. 

415. Principles of Literary Criticism. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

A study of the theory and practice of critics, together 
with written criticisms of prose and poetry. 

416. Principles and Types of Poetry. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

A study of versification and poetic types. 

417. Principles and Practice in Advanced Composition. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Prerequisites: English 1, 2, 3, and 213. 

Daily themes; criticisms, editorials, book reviews, 
intimate essays, and related types. 

418. Studies in American Literature. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

Studies in American literature, selected by the instruc- 
tor upon consultation with the students. 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 21 

GEOGRAPHY 

Mr. Picklesimer, Mr. Browne, Mr. Cummings 
GRADUATE COURSES 

410. Geography of World Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: approval of the teacher in charge of the 
class. 

A study of current international problems in the light of 
their natural environmental setting. Emphasis is placed 
upon the following topics: geography and the evolution 
of nations; the expansion of Europe; European influence 
in world affairs; the British Empire and its many prob- 
lems; geography and conflicting interests of the war-torn 
nations of Europe and Asia, and their effects upon the 
United States. 

440. Climatology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: approval of the teacher in charge of the 
class. 

The first part of the course is devoted to a rapid and 
intensive survey of climatic controls. This is followed by 
a study of the various climatic classifications, together 
with a comparison of the major climatic environments 
found in different parts of the world. The student will be 
directed in compiling, graphing, and mapping climatic 
data, and in interpreting the results. 

450. Geography of the South. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: approval of the teacher in charge of the 
class. 

A detailed study of the influences of geography on the 
development of the several regions of the American 
South. From the basis of physical complex, through 
economic products, are traced the lines of force that 
determine the life and labor of the contemporary South in 
Cotton Belt and Piney Woods. Delia and Southern High- 
lands, Industrial Piedmont and Texas Oil Fields. Sugar 
Bowl and Fishing Fringe, Rice Zone, and Florida Sub- 
tropics. 

460. Geography of the Orient. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

It is the purpose of this course to assist the student in 

understanding the geography of eastern Asia in the light 



22 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

of the present world conflict. The approach is through a 
study of race, political and social customs; regions and 
their commodities; and types of industry and commerce. 

HISTORY 

Mr. Frank, Miss Davis, Mr. Hilldrup, Mr. Hollar 
GRADUATE COURSES 

400. a.b.c. Seminar. 

Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit: six 
quarter hours. 

401. Europe since 1918. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

404. The Renaissance and the Reformation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

405. History of North Carolina since 1860. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

407. The Civil War and Reconstruction. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

408. United States History since 1877. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

410. Colonial Social and Cultural History. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history- 

411. Ancient Imperialism. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

412. Formation of the Federal Union, 1781 to 1801. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

421. Cultural History of Medieval Europe. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

425. Historiography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 23 

431. Social and Cultural History of the United States 
since 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

440. The Evolution of European Nationalism since 1789. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

451. Social and Cultural History of the United States, 
1789 to 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit. three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. ReBarker, Miss Graham, Miss Williams, Miss England 
GRADUATE COURSES 

400. a.b.c. Seminar. 

Three quarters. Two hours a week. Credit: six 
quarter hours. Required of students writing theses in the 
field of the teaching of mathematics. 

425-426. Theory of Equations. 

Fall and winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours each. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
213, 214, and 215. 

A study of complex numbers, roots, geometric construc- 
tion, cubic and quartic equations, graphs, isolation of real 
roots, solution of numerical equations, determinants, and 
symmetric functions. 

432. Differential Equations. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 
215. 

A study of ordinary differential equations of the first 
and second orders, and their application to element a iy 
mechanics, with emphasis on geometric interpretation and 
application. 

442. Advanced Calculus. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 
215. 

A study of the definite Integral as a sum and its appli- 
cations, partial derivatives, development in series, and 
multiple integrals. 



24 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

443. Solid Analytic Geometry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 
215. 

A study of coordinate geometry in space, the point, the 
line, the plane, surfaces of revolution, and quadratic 
surfaces. 

455. Readings and Research in the Teaching of Arith- 
metic. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

A study of the field of literature relating to the field of 
the teaching of arithmetic, with special emphasis on edu- 
cational research in the teaching of arithmetic. 

456. Readings and Research in the Teaching of Second- 
ary Mathematics. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

A study of educational literature relating to the field of 
the teaching of secondary mathematics with special em- 
phasis on research in this field. 

462. Problems in Mathematics Education. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

A laboratory course designed for the study of problems 
in the field of mathematics education relative to specific 
schools or school systems in which the student is employed 
or otherwise vitally interested. 

NATURAL SCIENCE 

Mr. Slay, Miss Austin, Mr. Brandt, Mr. DeLoach, 
Miss Humphreys, Mr. Reynolds, Miss Wilton 

SENIOR AND GRADUATE COURSES 

305. Plant Ecology. 

Spring quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labora- 
tory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. Prere- 
quisites: Biology 34, 35, 36, and Botany 212, 213, or 
their equivalent. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Field study of local plant communities from the stand- 
point of environment and its controlling factors. 

312. Food Chemistry. 

Spring quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labora- 
tory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. Prere- 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 25 

quisite: 24 hours of science including organic chemistry. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 

A course designed to accompany a more advanced study 
of foods. Food classification, analysis, detection of adul- 
terants, and tests for the detection of specific foods. 

325. Animal Ecology. 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work a week. 
Credit: four quarter hours. Prerequisite: a year of 
biology. Laboratory fee $2.00. 

A study of the relationships of animals to each other, 
to plants and to physical factors in their environments. 

330. Heredity. 

Spring quarter. Three hours of lecture a week and two 
hours of laboratory work per week optional. Credit: 
three or four quarter hours. Prerequisites: Biology 34, 
35, 36, or their equivalent or consent of instructor. 

A study of the laws of heredity and their application in 
evolution and eugenics. The laboratory work includes 
experiments with the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. 

350. Histology. 

Fall quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory 
work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. Prerequisite: 
At least two years of college biology. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. 

Slides of plant and animal tissues are prepared. Stu- 
dents learn to identify plant and animal tissues from these 
slides. Students are given the opportunity to prepare a 
collection of slides for their own use. 

360. Child Health Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the child from infancy through succeeding 
periods of growth and development. Special emphasis on 
the pre-school child and early adjustments of the school 
child. 

365. School and Community Health Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three Quarter hours. 

A study of the activities Involved In maintaining and 
improving school and community health. Special em- 
phasis on milk supply, food inspection, water supply, 
sewage disposal, and control of communicable diseases. 
Students will make field trips to observe various public 
health activities. 

370. Methods and Materials in Health Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours 
A study of some practical principles of health education 



26 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

designed for application in elementary and secondary 
schools. Special reference to sources of material avail- 
able to aid health instruction. Emphasis on planning 
well-integrated units for personal and community health 
study. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

400. a.b.c. Seminar. 

Two hours a week. Three quarters. Credit: six 
quarter hours. 

406. Embryology. 

Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labora- 
tory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. Prere- 
quisite: Two years of college biology. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. 

The early development of the vertebrates is studied, 
including the formation of the systems of organs. The 
development of some one vertebrate is studied in the 
laboratory. Slides showing this development are pre- 
pared by the students. 

408. Plant Anatomy and Morphology. 

Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of labora- 
tory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours. Prere- 
quisites: Biology 34, 35, 36 and Botany 212, 213, or 
their equivalents. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

A study of the origin and development of structures 
found in vascular plants. A study of both prepared slides 
and fresh materials which the student will prepare in the 
laboratory. 

410. Contemporary Science. 

Fall, winter or spring quarter. Three hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. Prerequisite: Two years 
of college science. 

Lectures, readings, reports, and discussions concerning 
the development of scientific thought with emphasis on 
recent advances. 

420. Investigations in Elementary Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course designed to offer opportunities for special 
investigations in the field of elementary science. 

430. The Teaching of General Science in Secondary 
Schools. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 17 

This course deals with content, methods, laboratory 
work, equipment, textbooks, tests, and reference readings 
of the introductory course in high school science. Atten- 
tion will be given to the special studies made in the field 
of general science. 

440. Teaching of the Biological Sciences in Secondary 
Schools. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

This course deals with the content, methods, laboratory 
work, equipment, textbooks, tests, and reference readings 
of the high school course in biology. Attention is given to 
the special studies made in the field of the high school 
biological studies. 

455. Experimental Evaluations in Science Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course deals with the evaluation of science texts 
and reference material; classroom and laboratory equip- 
ment; and the coordination of the various sciences. 

465. Current Problems in Science Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course deals with the current investigations in 
science education; critical evaluations of techniques, 
materials, results, and conclusions. 

475. Historical Development of School Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course traces the development of the study of 
science from its early stages to the present time. Special 
emphasis is placed upon the development of the present 
day secondary school sciences. 

480. Advanced Problems in the Physical Sciences. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course deals with the fusion of chemistry and 
physics as experienced in natural settings. Many demon- 
strations are included. 

485. The Lives and Works of Great Men of Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course deals with the development of science as 
portrayed by the contributions of noted scientists. The 
private lives and environments of them individuals will 
be stressed. 



28 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Mr. Adams, Miss Charlton, Mr. Haynes, Mr. Henderson, 
Miss Newell, Mr. McGinnis 

SENIOR AND GRADUATE COURSE 

340. Psychology of Adolescence. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 

This course is intended to make a study of pre- 
adolescence and adolescence. Behavioristic changes that 
are concomitant with the physiological changes of adoles- 
cence; their meaning and treatment in education training; 
social institutions designed to meet these changes, such as 
Boy Scouts and Campfire Girls, are some of the topics 
given consideration. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

410. Mental Tests and Measurements. 

Any quarter on demand. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 103 or 
its equivalent. 

Aim : To acquaint the student with mental tests and 
measurements. 

Topics: Group and individual tests; the technique of 
giving and scoring; interpretation of results; uses in classi- 
fying and promoting children; study of intelligence and 
its measurements. 

411. Psychology of Learning. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103 or its equivalent. 

Aim: To provide for the student a working knowledge 
of the laws of learning and habit formation. 

Topics: Animal learning; human learning; habit 
formation; analysis of the laws of learning. Experimental 
work is continued throughout the course. 

421. Social Psychology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology, including 103. 

In this course a study is made of the innate tendencies 
that are stimulated by other beings and their behavior. 
Also the organization of group attitudes, such as coop- 
eration, opposition, etc., and group habits, customs, 
language, and imitation. 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 29 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Mr. Wright, Mr. Flanagan, Mr. Toll 

SOCIOLOGY 

GRADUATE COURSES 

401. Racial Anthropology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the origin and development of the races of 
man. 

402. The development of Social Thought. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A history of social thought, including the outstanding 
social philosophies of the past and their influence in the 
development of culture. 

403. Social Legislation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A survey of the major types of social legislation in the 
United States and especially in North Carolina. 

ECONOMICS 

GRADUATE COURSES 

402, 403. Advanced Labor Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
An intensive and critical study of the major problems 
of industrial relations. 

410, 411. Problems in Public Finance. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 

A summary sketch of principles of public finance, fol- 
lowed by an intensive and critical study of tai systems 
and of the various policies and programs adopted by 
governments for raising and spending revenue. 

420, 421. History of Economic Thought. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 9 hours in ele- 
mentary economics. 

These courses treat such topics as the origin, nature 
and development of economic thought; economic thought 
of the ancients; the evolution of economics as a science; 
general account of recent Lading schools of economic 
thought. 



30 EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

GOVERNMENT 
GRADUATE COURSES 

401. International Relations. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of international organization and relationships. 

402. The Growth of Constitutional Government. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the history and growth of constitutional 
development with emphasis upon the sources of the 
American Constitution. 




Clifton Britton 

Founder of the Chi /'i Players, and 

Director of Dramatics <it East 

Carolina Teachers College.